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Category: Philosophy

Philosophy

Showing 1–60 of 707 results

  • From Plato To Christ

    $28.00

    What does Plato have to do with the Christian faith?

    Quite a bit, it turns out. In ways that might surprise us, Christians throughout the history of the church and even today have inherited aspects of the ancient Greek philosophy of Plato, who was both Socrates’s student and Aristotle’s teacher. To help us understand the influence of Platonic thought on the Christian faith, Louis Markos offers careful readings of some of Plato’s best-known texts and then traces the ways that his work shaped the faith of some of Christianity’s most beloved theologians, including Gregory of Nyssa, Augustine, Dante, and C. S. Lewis. With Markos’s guidance, readers can ascend to a true understanding of Plato’s influence on the faith.

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  • Tao Te Ching

    $16.99

    Although translations and interpretations of the Tao te Ching abound and new editions are released yearly, few accomplish the hard work of linking and bridging the Tao’s profound message to the needs of modern readers. There may be a profusion of versions, but our lives and our world reflect little of the deep, transformative potential of this important text.

    Marc S. Mullinax’s new translation grows from extensive teaching experience and combines a deep understanding of the Tao’s fourth-century BCE Chinese context with an exciting two-part application of that text to contemporary life.First, each of the eighty-one verses is joined by a richly curated array of quotes, sayings, poems, and stories from wisdom traditions around the globe. With quotes ranging from Emerson to Pink Floyd, and from the apostle Paul to Margaret Atwood, the Tao’s meaning comes alive in conversation with others.

    Second, a brief reflection puts the verse in historical context and highlights the transformative power of Wu-Wei, the non-interfering action, perfectly timed, to promote peace and prevent injury, to bring joy and justice to a hurting world.

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  • How Do We Reason

    $26.00

    How do we think? What does a faithful use of logic look like?

    Without even pausing to think about it, we exercise our capacity for rational thought. But how exactly does logic work? What makes some arguments valid and others not? In this Questions in Christian Philosophy volume, philosopher Forrest Baird offers an introduction to logic. He considers the basic building blocks of human reason, including types of arguments, fallacies, syllogisms, symbols, and proofs, all of which are demonstrated with exercises for students throughout. In addition, he reflects on the relationship between the use of reason and the Christian faith. With this academic but accessible primer, readers will be introduced to the basics of logic–and encouraged to reason better.

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  • Philosophy Made Slightly Less Difficult Second Edition

    $28.00

    Philosophy is for everyone. We think philosophically whenever we ask life’s big questions:
    *What is real?
    *How do we know what we know?
    *What is the right thing to do?
    *What does it mean to be human?
    *How should we view science and its claims?
    *Why should we believe that God exists?

    Philosophy is thinking critically about questions that matter. But many people find philosophy intimidating, so they never discover how invaluable it can be in engaging ideas, culture, and even their faith. Garrett DeWeese and J. P. Moreland understand these challenges, and in this book they apply their decades of teaching experience to help to make philosophy a little less difficult. Using straightforward language with plenty of everyday examples, they explain the basics needed to understand philosophical concepts–including logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, philosophical anthropology, and philosophy of science. This second edition includes new chapters on aesthetics and philosophy of religion, as well as updated content on some current issues in philosophy. Ultimately, DeWeese and Moreland argue, developing a philosophically informed worldview is absolutely critical for Christians and for the future of the church. Students, pastors, campus workers, and ordinary Christians will all benefit from this user-friendly guide.

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  • Beyond Order : 12 More Rules For Life (Large Type)

    $31.00

    The companion volume to 12 Rules for Life offers further guidance on the perilous path of modern life.

    In 12 Rules for Life, clinical psychologist and celebrated professor at Harvard and the University of Toronto Dr. Jordan B. Peterson helped millions of readers impose order on the chaos of their lives. Now, in this bold sequel, Peterson delivers twelve more lifesaving principles for resisting the exhausting toll that our desire to order the world inevitably takes.
    In a time when the human will increasingly imposes itself over every sphere of life–from our social structures to our emotional states–Peterson warns that too much security is dangerous. What’s more, he offers strategies for overcoming the cultural, scientific, and psychological forces causing us to tend toward tyranny, and teaches us how to rely instead on our instinct to find meaning and purpose, even–and especially–when we find ourselves powerless.

    While chaos, in excess, threatens us with instability and anxiety, unchecked order can petrify us into submission. Beyond Order provides a call to balance these two fundamental principles of reality itself, and guides us along the straight and narrow path that divides them.

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  • Beyond Order : 12 More Rules For Life

    $29.00

    The companion volume to 12 Rules for Life offers further guidance on the perilous path of modern life.

    In 12 Rules for Life, clinical psychologist and celebrated professor at Harvard and the University of Toronto Dr. Jordan B. Peterson helped millions of readers impose order on the chaos of their lives. Now, in this bold sequel, Peterson delivers twelve more lifesaving principles for resisting the exhausting toll that our desire to order the world inevitably takes.
    In a time when the human will increasingly imposes itself over every sphere of life–from our social structures to our emotional states–Peterson warns that too much security is dangerous. What’s more, he offers strategies for overcoming the cultural, scientific, and psychological forces causing us to tend toward tyranny, and teaches us how to rely instead on our instinct to find meaning and purpose, even–and especially–when we find ourselves powerless.

    While chaos, in excess, threatens us with instability and anxiety, unchecked order can petrify us into submission. Beyond Order provides a call to balance these two fundamental principles of reality itself, and guides us along the straight and narrow path that divides them.

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  • Rise And Triumph Of The Modern Self

    $34.99

    Modern culture is obsessed with identity. Since the landmark Obergefell v. Hodges Supreme Court decision in 2015, sexual identity has dominated both public discourse and cultural trends-and yet, no historical phenomenon is its own cause. From Augustine to Marx, various views and perspectives have contributed to the modern understanding of self. In The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self, Carl Trueman carefully analyzes the roots and development of the sexual revolution as a symptom, rather than the cause, of the human search for identity. This timely exploration of the history of thought behind the sexual revolution teaches readers about the past, brings clarity to the present, and gives guidance for the future as Christians navigate the culture’s ever-changing search for identity.

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  • How Do We Know

    $20.00

    What does it mean to know something? Epistemology, the study of knowledge, can often seem like a daunting subject. And yet few topics are more basic to human life. In this primer on epistemology, now in a second edition, James Dew and Mark Foreman provide an accessible entry into one of the most important disciplines within contemporary philosophy.

    What does it mean to know something? Can we have confidence in our knowledge? Epistemology, the study of knowledge, can often seem like a daunting subject. And yet few topics are more basic to human life. We are inquisitive creatures by nature, and the unending quest for truth leads us to raise difficult questions about the quest itself. What are the conditions, sources, and limits of our knowledge? Do our beliefs need to be rationally justified? Can we have certainty? In this primer on epistemology, James Dew and Mark Foreman guide readers through this discipline in philosophy. This second edition has been expanded with new material and now serves as the first volume in IVP’s Questions in Christian Philosophy series. By asking basic questions and using clear, jargon-free language, they provide an entry into one of the most important issues in contemporary philosophy.

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  • Thinking About The Prophets

    $21.95

    A Jewish Publication Society Title

    Rethinking the great literary prophets whose ministry ran from the eighth to the sixth centuries BCE–Amos, Hosea, First Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah, and Job–
    Thinking about the Prophets examines their often-shocking teachings in light of their times, their influence on later Western and Jewish thinkers, and their enduring lessons for all of us. As a noted scholar of Jewish philosophy, Kenneth Seeskin teases out philosophical, ethical, and theological questions in the writings, such as the nature of moral reasoning, the divine persona, divine providence, the suffering of the innocent, the power of repentance, and what it means to believe in a monotheistic conception of God.

    Seeskin demonstrates that great ideas are not limited by time or place, but rather once put forth, take on a life of their own. Thus he interweaves the medieval and modern philosophers Maimonides, Kant, Cohen, Buber, Levinas, Heschel, and Soloveitchik, all of whom read the prophets and had important things to say as a result. We come to see the prophets perhaps in equal measure as divinely authorized whistle-blowers and profound thinkers of the human condition.

    Readers of all levels will find this volume an accessible and provoking introduction to the enduring significance of biblical prophecy.

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  • Subordinated Ethics : Natural Law And Moral Miscellany In Aquinas And Dosto

    $71.00

    With Dostoyevsky’s Idiot and Aquinas’ Dumb Ox as guides, this book seeks to recover the elemental mystery of the natural law, a law revealed only in wonder. If ethics is to guide us along the way, it must recover its subordination; description must precede prescription. If ethics is to invite us along the way, it cannot lead, either as politburo, or even as public orthodoxy. It cannot be smugly symbolic but must be by way of signage, of directionality, of the open realization that ethical meaning is en route, pointing the way because it is within the way, as only sign, not symbol, can point to the sacramental terminus. The courtesies of dogma and tradition are the road signs and guideposts along the longior via, not themselves the termini. We seek the dialogic heart of the natural law through two seemingly contradictory voices and approaches: St. Thomas Aquinas and his famous five ways, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s holy idiot, Prince Myshkin. It is precisely the apparent miscellany of these selected voices that provide us with a connatural invitation into the natural law as subordinated, as descriptive guide, not as prescriptive leader.

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  • Subordinated Ethics : Natural Law And Moral Miscellany In Aquinas And Dosto

    $46.00

    With Dostoyevsky’s Idiot and Aquinas’ Dumb Ox as guides, this book seeks to recover the elemental mystery of the natural law, a law revealed only in wonder. If ethics is to guide us along the way, it must recover its subordination; description must precede prescription. If ethics is to invite us along the way, it cannot lead, either as politburo, or even as public orthodoxy. It cannot be smugly symbolic but must be by way of signage, of directionality, of the open realization that ethical meaning is en route, pointing the way because it is within the way, as only sign, not symbol, can point to the sacramental terminus. The courtesies of dogma and tradition are the road signs and guideposts along the longior via, not themselves the termini. We seek the dialogic heart of the natural law through two seemingly contradictory voices and approaches: St. Thomas Aquinas and his famous five ways, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s holy idiot, Prince Myshkin. It is precisely the apparent miscellany of these selected voices that provide us with a connatural invitation into the natural law as subordinated, as descriptive guide, not as prescriptive leader.

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  • Justice And Charity

    $29.99

    This book introduces Thomas Aquinas’s moral, economic, and political thought, differentiating between philosophy (justice) and theology (charity) within each of the three branches of Aquinas’s theory of human living. It shows how Aquinas’s thought offers an integrated vision for Christian participation in the world, equipping readers to apply their faith to the complex moral, economic, and political problems of contemporary society. Written in an accessible style by an experienced educator, the book is well-suited for use in a variety of undergraduate courses and provides a foundation for understanding Catholic social teaching.

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  • Grotesque In The Garden Second Edition

    $16.99

    After several millennia living as a lone sentinel in the Garden of Eden, the angel Tesque is contemplating leaving his post in rebellion against God. Meanwhile, in another time and place, a professor of mathematics isolates herself in remote Iceland as she finds herself increasingly at odds with society. The connection between these two characters? A letter, a sentient dog, and a deep-seated resistance to the demands of love.

    A Grotesque in the Garden is a philosophical tale that addresses some of theology’s thorniest problems, including the questions of divinely permitted evil, divine hiddenness, and divine deception, couching them in narrative form for greater accessibility to students and general readers. While Hudson’s story ultimately vindicates the virtue of obedience to God, it never shies away from critiques of troublesome theological positions.

    This second edition contains an appendix with commentary, discussion questions, and suggestions for further reading.

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  • Human Gravity : An Engineer’s Analysis Of Society-Government Relations

    $26.99

    Humanity lives inside 4 unyielding constraints, the speed of light, conservation of mass-energy, inefficiency in conversion of heat to work, and the law of demand. Society forms to deal with constraint. Government and religion set boundaries for society to deal with modeling and manipulating constraint.

    A societal dimension, moral consequence, and a government dimension, fairness, can be developed from mass-energy conservation equations for Society and its Economy. A model is proposed to relate these dimensions developing the Societal Operating Line (SOL) and definition of Productivity.

    The stability of a society can be determined by the forces applied to the SOL. A stable society will balance the forces of productivity and order versus the force of adversity. A special case of the forces acting on the SOL leads to the definition of a right, the fundamental building block of a Free Society.

    Improving fairness by government taking productivity from society is the basis for the Managed Society. In order to make society fairer, government takes more productivity and reduces the free exercise of rights to the point of demanding complete conformity.

    Government’s role in a Free Society can be modeled by comparing the economic function of society with a common engineering structure-the boiler. This role is likened to keeping the boiler water clean by removing contamination through blowdown. In a Managed Society, government manipulates blowdown to increase its power and influence.

    Applying these engineering models helps us to understand the material and energy balances of our societal-government relationship. A Free Society is shown to prosper because of unbound spiritual energy transfer while a Managed Society is shown to be limited by the finite distribution of things.

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  • Human Gravity : An Engineer’s Analysis Of Society-Government Relations

    $10.99

    Humanity lives inside 4 unyielding constraints, the speed of light, conservation of mass-energy, inefficiency in conversion of heat to work, and the law of demand. Society forms to deal with constraint. Government and religion set boundaries for society to deal with modeling and manipulating constraint.

    A societal dimension, moral consequence, and a government dimension, fairness, can be developed from mass-energy conservation equations for Society and its Economy. A model is proposed to relate these dimensions developing the Societal Operating Line (SOL) and definition of Productivity.

    The stability of a society can be determined by the forces applied to the SOL. A stable society will balance the forces of productivity and order versus the force of adversity. A special case of the forces acting on the SOL leads to the definition of a right, the fundamental building block of a Free Society.

    Improving fairness by government taking productivity from society is the basis for the Managed Society. In order to make society fairer, government takes more productivity and reduces the free exercise of rights to the point of demanding complete conformity.

    Government’s role in a Free Society can be modeled by comparing the economic function of society with a common engineering structure-the boiler. This role is likened to keeping the boiler water clean by removing contamination through blowdown. In a Managed Society, government manipulates blowdown to increase its power and influence.

    Applying these engineering models helps us to understand the material and energy balances of our societal-government relationship. A Free Society is shown to prosper because of unbound spiritual energy transfer while a Managed Society is shown to be limited by the finite distribution of things.

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  • Voiding Of Being

    $65.00

    In contemporary philosophy the status, indeed the very viability of metaphysics is a much contested issue. The reflections offered here explore diverse aspects of this contested status and offer a defence of metaphysics. In other works, perhaps most fully in Being and the Between, William Desmond has tried to develop what he calls a metaxological metaphysics in response to different skeptical, if not hostile approaches to metaphysics quite common in our time. The Voiding of Being complements the systematic dimensions of this metaxological metaphysics outlined in Being and the Between. It presents a set of studies which amplify important themes in the unfolding of modern metaphysics, in relation to major earlier and contemporary thinkers, while adding nuance to what is involved in the more systematic articulation of a metaxological metaphysics. There is what the author calls a voiding of being in modernity, expressed in diverse developments of thought. The Voiding of Being, might seems to conjure up too negative associations but the aim of the thoughts gathered here is not at all negative. While attempting to understand the voiding of being in modern thought, our appreciation of the promise of metaphysical thinking can also be renewed and indeed extended – extended beyond skepticism and hostility to metaphysics. Desmond engages many interlocutors along the way, from the long tradition, such as Heraclitus, Aquinas and Hegel, as well as more contemporary thinkers like Heidegger and Marion. As the book’s subtitle suggests, it is concerned with the continued doing of metaphysics and not only the contemporary undoing of it.

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  • Thiselton On Hermeneutics

    $96.50

    Anthony Thiselton’s masterful work in the field of hermeneutics has impacted countless students and scholars over the past several decades. Especially influential was his Two Horizons (1980), a call to take seriously the contexts of both the reader and the text. Thiselton’s work continues to carry much weight, yet there has been no single place to go to access a helpful array of his writings — until now.

    Thiselton on Hermeneutics provides select expositions and critical discussions of hermeneutics as a multidisciplinary area. Biblical interpretation, philosophical hermeneutics, literary theory, postmodernism, and Christian theology genuinely interact in these forty-two studies to form a coherent whole. Thiselton’s unique interactive and multidisciplinary approach shines through the volume. Ten of these essays — almost a quarter of the collection — are new (never published before) or quite recent.

    Theologians, biblical scholars, philosophers, and many other academics will appreciate this distillation of the pioneering perspectives and creative insights of Anthony C. Thiselton.

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  • Cooperation With Evil

    $34.95

    Contemporary society very often asks of individuals and/or corporate entities that they perform actions connected in some way with the immoral actions of other individuals or entities. Typically, in the attempt to determine what would be unacceptable cooperation with such immoral actions, Christian scholars and authorities refer to the distinction, which appears in the writings of Alphonsus Liguori, between material and formal cooperation, the latter being connected in some way with the cooperator’s intention in so acting. While expressing agreement with most of Alphonsus’s determinations in these regards, Cooperation with Evil also argues that the philosophical background to these determinations often lacks coherence, especially when compared to related passages in the writings of Thomas Aquinas.

    Having compared the philosophical approaches of these two great moralists, Cooperation with Evil then describes a number of ideas in Thomas’s writings that might serve as more effective tools for the analysis of cases of possible immoral cooperation. The book also includes, as appendixes, translations of relevant passages in both Alphonsus and Thomas.

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  • Kierkegaard And Spirituality

    $25.00

    We live spiritually when we live in the presence of God.

    The Danish philosopher Sren Kierkegaard is often read for his contributions to Christian theology, but he also has much to offer about spirituality–both Christian and more generally human.

    C. Stephen Evans assesses Kierkegaard’s belief that true spirituality should be seen as accountability: the grateful recognition of our existence as gift. Spirituality takes on a Christian flavor when one recognizes in Jesus Christ the human incarnation of the God who gives us being. In this clearly written and substantive book a leading scholar on Kierkegaard’s thought makes Kierkegaard’s contributions to spirituality accessible not only to philosophers and theologians but to pastors, spiritual directors, and lay Christians.

    The Kierkegaard and Christian Thought series, coedited by C. Stephen Evans and Paul Martens, aims to promote an enriched understanding of nineteenth-century philosopher-theologian Sren Kierkegaard in relation to other key figures in theology and key theological concepts.

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  • Moral Philosophy Of Dietrich Von Hildebrand

    $65.00

    What are values? How do we come to know them? How are values related to morality? How is it possible to act against ones better knowledge? How can one become blind to values? How important is requited love for human happiness? These are just some of the questions to which Dietrich von Hildebrand offers profound and original responses. He arrives at these answers not primarily by a critical discussion of other thinkers (classical or modern) but by turning to the things themselves, that is, to the reality of moral life. Von Hildebrand’s keen sense for categorization, crucial distinctions, and systematic philosophizing does not reduce the rich and complex sphere of moral phenomena to a few abstract principles or rules. On the contrary, it allows the reader of his works to see the moral data with new clarity and explicitness.

    Although von Hildebrands importance as an early phenomenologist and a moral philosopher has been generally recognized for decades, his thought has never been the study of much scholarly work. The Moral Philosophy of Dietrich von Hildebrand is the first full-fledged monograph on von Hildebrand’s moral philosophy available to date. Despite this pioneering effort, its aim is not to treat all the themes belonging to this area with equal depth and breadth. Rather, it focuses on the themes indicated by the aforementioned questions and relates them according to their inner systematic links rather than according to how and when they appear in von Hildebrand’s works. It also engages von Hildebrand in a critical dialogue, particularly with the ethics of Plato and Aristotle. This book will serve as a very good introduction not just to von Hildebrands moral philosophy but to his thought in general.

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  • Thomistic Existentialism And Cosmological Reasoning

    $65.00

    Cosmological reasoning is an important facet of classical arguments for the existence of God, but these arguments have been subject to may criticisms. The thesis of this book is that Thomas Aquinas can dodge many of the classic objections brought against cosmological reasoning. These objections criticize cosmological reasoning for its use of the Principle of Sufficient Reason; its notion of existence as a predicate; its use of ontological reasoning; its reliance on sense realism; its ignoring of the problem of evil; and its susceptibility to the critique of ontotheology as famously put forward by Heidegger. All of these objections receive a reply, showing that Aquinas’s De Ente et Essentia reasoning for God as esse tantum employs a more nuanced understanding of a thing’s existence than is found in Leibniz’s classic cosmological arguments.

    Secondly, the book proposes that the kind of reasoning found in Aquinas’s De Ente can be formulated in a more robust version. Prompted by Aquinas’s admissions that philosophical knowledge of God is the prerogative of metaphysics, the second main portion of the book extensively illustrates how the more robust version of the De Ente is the interpretive key for Aquinas’s many arguments for God. Hence, the book should be of interest both to philosophers engaged in cosmological reasoning discussion and to Thomists interested in understanding Aquinas’s viae to God.

    Finally, the deep purpose of the book is to reawaken interest in Thomistic Existentialism, an interpretation of Aquinas that flourished in the 1950’s in the works of Etienne Gilson, Jacques Maritain, and Joseph Owens. In this interpretation, a particular thing’s existence is the actuality of the thing in the sense of a distinctive actus not translatable into something else, for example, the fact of the thing or the thing having form. This book clearly explains how this interpretation looks at Thomas’s metaphysics, and why it helps illuminate metaphysical realities.

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  • Cyberdimension : A Political Theology Of Cyberspace And Cybersecurity

    $35.00

    In 2013, Edward Snowden released a trove of documents revealing the extent of government electronic surveillance. Since then, we have been inundated with reports of vicious malware attacks, election hacking, data breaches, potential cyberwars, fights over Net Neutrality, and fake internet news. Where once discussion of cyberspace was full of hope of incredible potential benefits for humanity and global connection, it has become the domain of fear, anxiety, conflict, and authoritarian impulses. As the cloud of the Net darkens into a storm, are there insights from Christian theology about our online existence? Is the divine present in this phenomenon known as cyberspace? Is it a realm of fear or a realm of hope?

    In The Cyberdimension, Eric Trozzo engages these questions, seeking not only a theological means of speaking about cyberspace in its ambiguity, but also how the spiritual dimension of life provokes resistance to the reduction of life to what can be calculated. Rather than focusing on the content available online, he looks to the structure of cyberspace itself to find a chastened yet still expectant vision of divinity amidst the political, economic, and social forces at play in the cyber realm.

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  • Kierkegaards Theological Sociology

    $40.00

    Kierkegaard developed a distinctive type of sociology in the 1840s–a theological sociology. Looking at society through the lens of analysis categories such as worship, sin, and faith, Kierkegaard developed a profoundly insightful way of understanding how, for example, the modern mass media works. He gets right inside the urban world of Golden Age Denmark, and its religion, and analyses the present age of consumption, comfort, competition, distraction, and image-construction with astonishing depth. To Kierkegaard worship centers all individuals and all societies; hence his sociology is doxological. This book argues that we also live in the present age Kierkegaard described, and our way of life can be understood much better through Kierkegaard’s lens than through the methodologically materialist categories of classical sociology. As social theory itself has moved beyond classical sociology, the social sciences are increasingly open to post-methodologically-atheist approaches to understanding what it means to be human beings living in social contexts. The time is right to recover the theological resources of Christian faith in understanding the social world we live in. The time has come to pick up where Kierkegaard left off, and to start working towards a prophetic doxological sociology for our times.

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  • Kierkegaards Theological Sociology

    $20.00

    Kierkegaard developed a distinctive type of sociology in the 1840s–a theological sociology. Looking at society through the lens of analysis categories such as worship, sin, and faith, Kierkegaard developed a profoundly insightful way of understanding how, for example, the modern mass media works. He gets right inside the urban world of Golden Age Denmark, and its religion, and analyses the present age of consumption, comfort, competition, distraction, and image-construction with astonishing depth. To Kierkegaard worship centers all individuals and all societies; hence his sociology is doxological. This book argues that we also live in the present age Kierkegaard described, and our way of life can be understood much better through Kierkegaard’s lens than through the methodologically materialist categories of classical sociology. As social theory itself has moved beyond classical sociology, the social sciences are increasingly open to post-methodologically-atheist approaches to understanding what it means to be human beings living in social contexts. The time is right to recover the theological resources of Christian faith in understanding the social world we live in. The time has come to pick up where Kierkegaard left off, and to start working towards a prophetic doxological sociology for our times.

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  • Philosophy : A Christian Introduction

    $26.99

    Two experienced educators offer an up-to-date introduction to philosophy from a Christian perspective that covers the four major areas of philosophical thought: epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of religion, and ethics. Written from an analytic perspective, the book introduces key concepts and issues within the main areas of philosophical inquiry in a comprehensive yet accessible way, inviting readers on a quest for goodness, truth, and beauty that ultimately points to Jesus as the source of all.

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  • Notes On Bergson And Descartes

    $60.00

    Charles Peguy (1873-1914) was a French religious poet, philosophical essayist, publisher, social activist, Dreyfusard, and Catholic convert. There has recently been a renewed recognition of Peguy in France as a thinker of unique significance, a reconsideration inspired in large part by Gilles Deleuze’s Difference et repetition, which ranked him with Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. In the English-speaking world, however, access to Peguy has been hindered by a scarcity of translations of his work. This first complete translation of one of his most important prose works, with accompanying interpretive introduction and notes, will introduce English-speaking readers to a new voice, which speaks in a powerful and original way to a modern West in a condition of cultural and spiritual crisis. The immediate circumstance of the writing of this last prose essay, unfinished at the time of Peguy’s early death, was the placing of Henri Bergson’s philosophical works on the Catholic Index, and Peguy’s undertaking to defend his former teacher from his critics, both Catholic and secular. But the subject of Bergson is also a springboard for the exploration of the perennial themes-philosophical, theological, and literary-most central to Peguy’s thought.

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  • Notes On Bergson And Descartes

    $35.00

    Charles Peguy (1873-1914) was a French religious poet, philosophical essayist, publisher, social activist, Dreyfusard, and Catholic convert. There has recently been a renewed recognition of Peguy in France as a thinker of unique significance, a reconsideration inspired in large part by Gilles Deleuze’s Difference et repetition, which ranked him with Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. In the English-speaking world, however, access to Peguy has been hindered by a scarcity of translations of his work. This first complete translation of one of his most important prose works, with accompanying interpretive introduction and notes, will introduce English-speaking readers to a new voice, which speaks in a powerful and original way to a modern West in a condition of cultural and spiritual crisis. The immediate circumstance of the writing of this last prose essay, unfinished at the time of Peguy’s early death, was the placing of Henri Bergson’s philosophical works on the Catholic Index, and Peguy’s undertaking to defend his former teacher from his critics, both Catholic and secular. But the subject of Bergson is also a springboard for the exploration of the perennial themes-philosophical, theological, and literary-most central to Peguy’s thought.

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  • Aquinas On Emotions Participation In Reason

    $75.00

    Aquinas on Emotion’s Participation in Reason aims to present Aquinas’s answer to the perennial and now popular question: In what way can the emotions be rational? For Aquinas, the starting point of this inquiry is Aristotle’s claim (EN. I. 13) that there are three parts to the soul: 1) the rational part, 2) the non-rational part which can participate in reason, and 3) the non-rational part that does not participate in reason. It is the extent to which the second part (the sense appetites, the seat of the emotions) participates in reason that the emotions can become rational. However, immediately after Aristotle introduces his tripartite division of the soul, he warns that one need not delve into the details of the division or the participation. Aquinas, however, ignores Aristotle, and uses his precise metaphysics of participation within in his sophisticated anthropology to great effect in his ethics. Unlike Aristotle, to fully understand Aquinas’s thinking on how the emotions can become rational, we simply must delve into the kinds of precisions that Aristotle thinks are misplaced. When Aquinas’s views emerge from these precisions, he has a surprisingly level-headed and commonsense view of how the emotions can become rational. On this point, he is more pessimistic than Aristotle and more optimistic than Kant; he is certainly not, as is he is often thought to be, the faithful follower of Aristotle and the polar opposite of Kant. Nicholas Kahm argue that Aquinas has a realistic and plausible view of how far reason can go in shaping our emotions. Furthermore, his plausible views can accommodate the serious current challenge raised against virtue ethics from social psychology. The method has mainly been a careful reading of primary texts, but unlike the rest of the scholarship on Aquinas’s ethics, Kahm is particularly sensitive to Aquinas’s historical and philosophical development.

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  • Action And Character According To Aristotle

    $34.95

    Aristotle labors under no illusion that in the practical sphere humans operate according to the canons of logic. This does not prevent him, however, from bringing his own logical acumen to his study of human behavior. Aristotle, according to Fr. Flannery, depicts the way in which human acts of various sorts and in various combinations determine the logical structure of moral character. Some moral characters – or character types – manage to incorporate a high degree of practical consistency; others incorporate less, without forfeiting their basic orientation towards the good. Still others approach utter inconsistency or moral deprivation, although even these, in so far as they are responsible for their actions, retain a core element of rationality in their souls. According to Aristotle, moral character depends ultimately upon the structure of individual acts and upon how they fit together into a whole that is consistent – or not consistent – with justice and friendship.

    This book will appeal to professional scholars and graduate students with an interest in Aristotle’s ethics and in ethics generally. It proposes comprehensive interpretations of some difficult passages in Aristotle’s two major ethical works ( the Nicomachean Ethics and the Eudemian Ethics ). It brings to bear upon the analysis of human behavior passages in Aristotle’s logical works and in his Physics. It also draws connections among areas of particular interest to contemporary ethics: action theory, the analysis of practical reason, and virtue ethics.

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  • Nature In American Philosophy

    $34.95

    In the European settlement of the New World, encounter with nature was a drama of success or failure, life or death. As American civilization became established in the nineteenth century and the United States assumed its own cultural voice, the relation between nature and the human being became a theme in American philosophy in ways it had not been in Europe. This book collects essays by leading scholars, both American and European, on the American understanding of nature from Emerson to Dewey and beyond. The volume features essays on Emerson and Thoreau, Royce, Peirce, Wright, James, Holmes, Tocqueville, and Dewey. Topics include the role of nature in American idealism, the influence of Darwin, naturalism in psychology, and human nature in political thought. The final essay presents a comprehensive taxonomy of views of nature in relation to expressions of nature in American art.

    Clearly evident in the book is the variety of ways European influences on American philosophy were modified as they were received by American thinkers. The most important theme that emerges from the collection as a whole is the importance of community as the mediator between nature and the individual. As in their conquest of the frontier, so also in their philosophy, Americans chose not to face nature alone. Nature is interpreted in the light of shared human purposes. The culture of community, whether the frontier town or Peirce’s community of scientific investigators, makes nature intelligible and manageable.

    With its focus on philosophy of nature, this book fills a gap in the ongoing reassessment of nineteenth-century American philosophy, and it opens the way to further study of the role played by reflection on nature in the emergence of the American mind.

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  • Thinking Through Revelation

    $34.95

    Navigating the seemingly competing claims of human reason and divine revelation to truth is without a doubt one of the central problems of medieval philosophy. Medieval thinkers argued a whole gamut of positions on the proper relation of religious faith to human reason. Thinking Through Revelation attempts to ask deeper questions: what possibilities for philosophical thought did divine revelation open up for medieval thinkers? How did the contents of the sacred scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam put into question established philosophical assumptions? But most fundamentally, how did not merely the content of the sacred books but the very mode in which revelation itself is understood to come to us – as a book sent down from on high, as a covenant between God and his people, or as incarnate person – create or foreclose possibilities for the resolution of the philosophical problems that the Abrahamic revelations themselves raised?

    Robert Dobie explores these questions by looking in detail at the thought of three of the most important philosopher-theologians of the Middle Ages: Averroes, Moses Maimonides, and Thomas Aquinas, each working within the Islamic, Jewish, and Christian traditions respectively. Of particular interest are two questions central to medieval thought: in what sense is the world created and what is the proper nature and ontological status of the human intellect? These two problems took on such importance in this period, this book argues, because they forced medieval philosophers and theologians to confront the degree to which the revelation they considered authoritative made possible their resolution.

    Thus, these medieval thinkers show thinkers today what possibilities are available for navigating the age-old question of the proper relation between faith and reason in a world where questions of the rationality of religious faith – especially from an inter-faith perspective – are not diminishing but increasing in importance.

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  • Reading Cusanus : Metaphor And Dialectic In A Conjectural Universe

    $69.95

    This book presents careful readings of six of the most important theoretical works of Nicholas of Cusa (1401-1463). Though Nicholas’ writings have long been studied as either scholastic Aristotelian or proto-Kantian, Clyde Lee Miller locates Cusanus squarely in the Christian Neoplatonic tradition. He demonstrates how Nicholas worked out his own original synthesis of that tradition by fashioning a conjectural view of main categories of Christian thought: God, the universe, Jesus Christ, and human beings. Each of the readings reveals how Nicholas’ project of learned ignorance is played out in striking metaphors for God and the relation of God to creation.

    The six works read span the last quarter century of Nicholas’ life (1440-1463) and include On Learned Ignorance, Conjectures, The Layman: About Mind, The Vision of God, The Not Other, and The Hunt for Wisdom. These readings are explications of the text; they interpret each work as a whole and focus in particular on the themes that order the work and how these get played out in its details. The Introduction uses a brief early dialogue, On the Hidden God, to orient the reader by locating Nicholas’ work in relation to Plato’s famous image of the divided line. The book’s conclusion presents a reprise of the main ideas in each work and an appraisal of their import.

    This books makes an important contribution to Cusanus studies, for no book-length scholarly work in English reads and comments on Nicholas’ individual works. Reading Cusanus provides a much-needed introduction to this great philosopher, theologian, and mystic.

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  • From Kant And Royce To Heidegger

    $34.95

    In this study, Charles M. Sherover argues that there is a single, substantial line of development that can be traced from the work of Leibniz through Kant and Royce to Heidegger. Sherover traces a movement from deep within the roots of German idealism through Royce’s insights into American pragmatism to the ethical ramifications of Heidegger’s existential phenomenology, and then provides an analysis of the neglected ethical and political implications of Heidegger’s Being and Time. The essays lead finally to Sherover’s own view of the self as a member of a moral and political community.

    Charles M. Sherover is Professor Emeritus of philosophy, Hunter College, City University of New York. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including Heidegger, Kant and Time and Time, Freedom and the Common Good. Gregory R. Johnson is Visiting Assistant Professor at the Pacific School of Religion.

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  • Reading Cusanus : Metaphor And Dialectic In A Conjectural Universe

    $34.95

    This book presents careful readings of six of the most important theoretical works of Nicholas of Cusa (1401-1463). Though Nicholas’ writings have long been studied as either scholastic Aristotelian or proto-Kantian, Clyde Lee Miller locates Cusanus squarely in the Christian Neoplatonic tradition. He demonstrates how Nicholas worked out his own original synthesis of that tradition by fashioning a conjectural view of main categories of Christian thought: God, the universe, Jesus Christ, and human beings. Each of the readings reveals how Nicholas’ project of learned ignorance is played out in striking metaphors for God and the relation of God to creation.

    The six works read span the last quarter century of Nicholas’ life (1440-1463) and include On Learned Ignorance, Conjectures, The Layman: About Mind, The Vision of God, The Not Other, and The Hunt for Wisdom. These readings are explications of the text; they interpret each work as a whole and focus in particular on the themes that order the work and how these get played out in its details. The Introduction uses a brief early dialogue, On the Hidden God, to orient the reader by locating Nicholas’ work in relation to Plato’s famous image of the divided line. The book’s conclusion presents a reprise of the main ideas in each work and an appraisal of their import.

    This books makes an important contribution to Cusanus studies, for no book-length scholarly work in English reads and comments on Nicholas’ individual works. Reading Cusanus provides a much-needed introduction to this great philosopher, theologian, and mystic.

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  • 1 Hundred Years Of Philosophy

    $34.95

    This collection originated in the centenary celebration of the School of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America. Written by acknowledged experts in their fields, the essays provide a unique overview of philosophical developments in the twentieth century. The broad range of topics considered makes the book an invaluable reference work.

    The first set of essays deals with philosophy in the English-speaking world. Thomas R. Russman argues that British philosophy is best understood as reflecting a long-standing preoccupation with the refutation of idealism. William Wallace narrates the development of the philosophy of science. Peter Simpson provides an account of Anglo-American moral theory, and Robert George discusses Anglo-American legal philosophy.

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  • Freedom And The Human Person

    $34.95

    In the Western tradition, freedom and the human person have been at the center of philosophical, theological, moral, and political debates since the origins of this tradition. Although contemporary discourse betrays the multiplicity of these roots, the necessary historical perspective for evaluating them is almost always lacking, even in scholarly studies. The terms freedom and person carry such overwhelming force in the modern world that the critical distance required for grasping what is at stake in using them is extremely hard to gain.

    The present collection seeks to contribute toward finding that distance by making the tradition of thought more a living reality and not an object of arid analyses. Unlike most collections the present one transcends disciplinary boundaries, as it acknowledges the interconnectedness of philosophical, theological, and political arguments on these themes.

    The contributors are prominent authorities in particular historical periods or in figures in Western thought, and they treat approaches to freedom and the human person in ancient Greek, biblical, medieval and modern sources, although the major emphasis is on the thought of leading philosophers (Plato, Boethius, Aquinas, Ockham, Machiavelli, Locke, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Husserl, et al.). Their essays bring forward profound contrasts in how freedom and personhood have been grounded and characterized, notably the contrasts between groundings in natural reason and in supernatural revelation, between premodern teleological thinking and modern thinking on self-sovereignty without teleology, and within modern thought between positions favoring individual autonomy and others securing freedom and its exercise in communal or traditional life. Several of the papers shed light on the relations of freedom and personhood to the human powers of speech, thought, and judgment.

    The contributors to the volume are Seth Benardete, Michael Gillespie, Leon Kass, Robert B. Pippin, Robert Rethy, John M. Rist, Brian J. Shanley, O. P., Susan Meld Shell, Robert Sokolowski, Eleonore Stump, Nathan Tarcov, and Michael P. Zuckert (with Jesse Covington and James Thompson).

    Richard Velkley, former professor of philosophy at the Catholic University of America, is Celia Scott Weatherhead Professor of Philosophy at Tulane University. He is author of Freedom and the End of Reason: On the Moral Foundation of Kant’s Critical Philosophy and Being after Rousseau: Philosophy and Culture in Questio

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  • Scholastic Meditations

    $34.95

    The newest volume in the ongoing Studies in Philosophy and the History of Philosophy series comprises ten essays that mediate between Scholastic concerns and contemporary philosophical issues. Distinguished author and philosopher Nicholas Rescher suggests that the Scholastic era–the 500-year period from Abelard to Suarez–was a model of philosophical activity. More than at any other stage of history, philosophy stood at the center of academic and intellectual culture. And many of the criticisms of the scholastic thinkers voiced since that time–their preoccupation with subtle distinctions and logic-chopping, for example–fail to do justice to the seriousness of their concerns and to the fact that their subtleties generally served a clear purpose with regard to the clarification of significant philosophical issues.

    The studies gathered in this volume seek to do homage to the spirit of Scholasticism. They address key issues in that tradition–some from an historical point of view, others from a more substantive standpoint. The essays are written in the conviction that there is much to be learned from the schoolmen even when one fails to agree with their substantive doctrinal positions. The methods they employed and their commitment to their projects have much to teach–and to inspire–us about the proper conduct of philosophizing.

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  • Categories : Historical And Systematic Essays

    $34.95

    This volume addresses the subject of categories: What are they? How are they used in speaking and thinking? What role do they play in our moral deliberations? Why are there different sorts of categories? And are categories independent of our thinking and speaking, giving objective form to the world we aim to think and speak about? These and other questions concerning categories have been part of philosophy from the very beginning, and they raise foundational issues in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and other branches of philosophy. Yet pursuing answers to these questions has proven difficult, because investigations into categories push us to the very limits of what we can know.

    The essays in this volume, written by a mix of well-established and younger philosophers, bridge divides between historical and systematic approaches in philosophy as well divides between analytical, continental, and American traditions. They offer new interpretations of Aristotle, Confucius, Aquinas, Buridan, Kant, Pierce, Husserl, and Wittgenstein, and they challenge received views on normativity, the value of set theory, the objectivity of category schemes, and other topics.

    This volume, the first to offer a comprehensive examination of the subject, challenges mainstream positions on category theory. It will be of particular interest to philosophers and others concerned with how the world is divided.

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  • Themes In Kants Metaphysics And Ethics

    $34.95

    Intended for those interested in Kant’s contribution to philosophy, this volume provides an overview of Kant’s arguments concerning central issues in metaphysics and ethics. Arthur Melnick argues that the key to all of Kant’s arguments is his constructivist theory of space and time. Melnick shows that Kant’s arguments for causation and for substance, as well as Kant’s refutation of Cartesian skepticism, are far more cogent than usually thought. Further, this theory distinguishes Kant’s idealism from phenomenalism, verificationism, and internal realism. For Kant, metaphysics is tied to cognition; thus one must understand his account of cognition in order to fully grasp his metaphysics. Melnick argues that for Kant, thoughts or cognitions are rules for situating oneself with regard to reality-contacting procedures. In accord with this account, Melnick defends both Kant’s conception of categories and a robust correspondence theory of truth.

    The essays on ethics revolve around the notion of practical reasoning. Melnick contends that Kant is correct that such reasoning cannot be causally determined. This undercuts any compatibilist account of freedom of action as action controllable by practical reasoning. Kant’s moral theory is claimed to be a version of social-contract theory. This explains some troublesome aspects in Kant’s formulations of his categorical imperative. Melnick claims that such theories, even with Kant’s connection of them to autonomy, do not function well as motivational justifications of morality. He offers a different version of a categorical imperative that is supposed to avoid this problem.

    Arthur Melnick is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Illinois, Urbana. A specialist in the philosophy of Kant, Melnick is the author of Kant’s Analogies of Experience, Space, Time and Thought in Kant, and Representation of the World: A Naturalized Semantics. He has also published numerous articles and book reviews.

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  • Impact Of Aristotelianism On Modern Philosophy

    $34.95

    This volume provides the first extensive assessment of the impact of Aristotelianism on the history of philosophy from the Renaissance to the end of the twentieth century. The contributors have considered Aristotelian issues in late scholastic, Renaissance, and early modern philosophers such as Vernia, Nifo, Barbaro, Cajetan, Piccolomini, Patrizzi, Zabarella, Campanella, Galileo, Semery, Leibniz, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, and Gadamer. Specific attention is given to the role of the five intellectual virtues set forth by Aristotle in book VI of the Nicomachean Ethics, namely art, prudence, science, wisdom, and intellect.

    In addition to the editor, the contributors are: Enrico Berti, Richard Cobb-Stevens, Daniel O. Dahlstrom, Michael Davis, John P. Doyle, Alfredo Ferrarin, Edward P. Mahoney, Christia Mercer, Antonino Poppi, Stanley Rosen, Richard Velkley, and William A. Wallace.

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  • Vices Virtues And Consequences

    $34.95

    Vices, Virtues, and Consequences offers a broad study of the basic and universal issues in ethics and politics, the issues of what the human good is and how to attain it and avoid its opposite. These questions have long been debated and are no less debated today. However, according to author Peter Phillips Simpson, within the mainstream of Anglo-American modern philosophy they have been debated too narrowly. This narrowness is one of our modern vices, and it does much to encourage other vices, in particular that of despair of universal and objective reason. The essays in this collection not only attack these vices, but also attempt to replace them with the contrary virtues.

    The volume begins with an overview of modern Anglo-American moral philosophy and critiques the work of contemporary thinkers–specifically Alasdair MacIntyre and John Rawls–and the work of historical thinkers such as Machiavelli, Kant, and Hobbes. The author then explores ancient and medieval sources, and applies their concepts to discussions of modern problems.

    The book closes with chapters that discuss the direct consequences of contemporary vices in both thought and action, in particular the vice of failing to educate the morals of citizens. Simpson rejects the contemporary liberal dogma that political authority should not be involved in the moral education of citizens. Violence in Northern Ireland and the crime of abortion are among the issues discussed.

    Peter Phillips Simpson is professor of philosophy and classics at the Graduate Center and the College of Staten Island, City University of New York. He is the author of numerous articles and books including The Politics of Aristotle, A Philosophical Commentary on the Politics of Aristotle, and Karol Wojtyla.

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  • History Of Christian Philosophy In The Middle Ages

    $34.95

    SKU (ISBN): 9780813231952Etienne GilsonBinding: Trade PaperPublished: 2019Publisher: Catholic University of America Press

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  • Reimagining The Analogia Entis

    $80.00

    In 1932 German theologian and philosopher Erich Przywara penned his Analogia Entis, a vision of the analogy of being and a metaphysical exploration of the dynamic between God and creation. A translation into English in 2014 made Przywara’s brilliant and influential work available to more people than ever before.

    In this book Philip Gonzales calls English-speaking readers to embrace the Christian treasure of the Analogia Entis and to reimagine what it offers Christians today. Gonzales brings Przywara’s text into dialogue with debates in contemporary philosophy and theology, engaging in conversation with Edith Stein, Karl Barth, Martin Heidegger, the Nouvelle theologie, Vatican II, and leading figures in postmodern theology and the Continental turn to religion. The first book of its kind in English, Reimagining the Analogia Entis articulates a Christian vision of being for the postmodern era.

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  • Meaning Of The Universe

    $17.95

    A Christopher Andrus Title

    Why are you alive? Amazingly, many today have never really asked yourselves this. This is mainly due to the worldview, or basic belief-system, that most accept today. But is this worldview (known as Humanism) correct? We will show, first, that it has fatal flaws, so it can’t be. And, second, the view it replaced is actually the correct one.

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  • Catholic Bioethics And Social Justice

    $39.95

    Catholic health care is one of the key places where the church lives Catholic social teaching (CST). Yet the individualistic methodology of Catholic bioethics inherited from the manualist tradition has yet to incorporate this critical component of the Catholic moral tradition. Informed by the places where Catholic health care intersects with the diverse societal injustices embodied in the patients it encounters, this book brings the lens of CST to bear on Catholic health care, illuminating a new spectrum of ethical issues and practical recommendations from social determinants of health, immigration, diversity and disparities, behavioral health, gender-questioning patients, and environmental and global health issues.

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  • Karol Wojtylas Personalist Philosophy

    $34.95

    An important milestone of 20th Century philosophy was the rise of personalism. After the crimes and atrocities against millions of human beings in two World Wars, especially the Second, some philosophers and other thinkers began to seek arguments showing the value of each human being, to expose and denounce the folly of political structures that violate the inalienable rights of the individual person.

    Karol Wojtyla appeals to the ancient concept of ‘person’ to emphasize the particular value of each human being. The person is unique because of their subjectivity by which they possesses an unrepeatable interior world in the history of humanity. Their rational nature grants them a special character among living beings, among which is the transcendence to the infinite. Wojtyla magisterially shows how each human being’s personhood is rooted in a conscious and free subjectivity, which is marked also by personal and social responsibility. Wojtyla’s original philosophical analysis takes for its starting point the human act, in which consciousness and experience consolidate voluntary choices, which are objectively efficacious. By their acts, the person determines their own personhood. This self-dominion manifests the person and enables them to live together in a community in which one’s neighbor can be a companion on the voyage of life.

    This work provides a clear guide to Karol Wojtyla’s principal philosophical work, Person and Act, rigorously analyzing the meaning that the author intended in his exposition. An important feature of the work is that the authors rely on the original Polish text, Osoba i czyn, as well as the best translations into Italian and Spanish, rather than on a flawed and sometimes misleading English edition of the work.

    Besides the analysis of Wojtyla’s masterwork, this volume offers three chapters examining the impact of Wojtyla’s anthropology on the relationship between faith and reason.

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  • Witness : Lessons From Elie Wiesels Classroom

    $26.00

    Elie Wiesel was a towering presence on the world stage-a Nobel laureate, activist, adviser to world leaders, and the author of more than forty books, including the Oprah’s Book Club selection Night. But when asked, Wiesel always said, I am a teacher first.

    In fact, he taught at Boston University for nearly four decades, and with this book, Ariel Burger-devoted protege, apprentice, and friend-takes us into the sacred space of Wiesel’s classroom. There, Wiesel challenged his students to explore moral complexity and to resist the dangerous lure of absolutes. In bringing together never-before-recounted moments between Wiesel and his students, Witness serves as a moral education in and of itself-a primer on educating against indifference, on the urgency of memory and individual responsibility, and on the role of literature, music, and art in making the world a more compassionate place.

    Burger first met Wiesel at age fifteen; he became his student in his twenties, and his teaching assistant in his thirties. In this profoundly thought-provoking and inspiring book, Burger gives us a front-row seat to Wiesel’s remarkable exchanges in and out of the classroom, and chronicles the intimate conversations between these two men over the decades as Burger sought counsel on matters of intellect, spirituality, and faith, while navigating his own personal journey from boyhood to manhood, from student and assistant, to rabbi and, in time, teacher.

    Listening to a witness makes you a witness, said Wiesel. Ariel Burger’s book is an invitation to every reader to become Wiesel’s student, and witness.

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  • Body And Ultimate Concern

    $35.00

    Mercer University Press Title

    Paul Tillich’s account of ultimate concern has been crucial for his theological legacy. It is a concept that has been taken up and adapted by many theologians in an array of subfields. However, Tillich’s own account of ultimate concern and many of the subsequent uses of it have focused on intelligibility: the ways it makes what is ultimate more accessible to us as rational beings. This volume charts a different course by placing Tillich’s theology in conversation with theories of radical embodiment. Essays gathered here use discourses on the particularity and mutability of the body to offer a critical vantage point for constructive engagement with Tillich’s central theological category: ultimate concern. Each essay explores how individuals can be special bearers of ultimate concern by engaging the body’s role in faith, religion, and culture. Contributors include: David H. Nikkel, Kayko Driedger Hesslein, Beth Ritter-Conn, Tyler Atkinson, Courtney Wilder, Adam Pryor, and Devan Stahl.

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  • History Of Western Philosophy

    $65.00

    Acknowledgments

    1. Introduction To The Project
    2. The Beginnings Of Western Philosophy
    3. Socrates And The Sophists
    4. Plato
    5. Aristotle
    6. Philosophy In The Hellenistic And Roman Periods
    7. Early Christian Thought Through Augustine
    8. Early Medieval Thought
    9. The High Middle Ages (I): Thomas Aquinas
    10. The High Middle Ages (II): Bonaventure, Scotus, Ockham
    11. Philosophy Between The Medieval And Modern Periods
    12. Descartes And The Beginning Of Modern Philosophy
    13. Continental Rationalism: Spinoza And Leibniz
    14. British Empiricism: Locke And Berkeley
    15. The Scottish Enlightenment (I): David Hume
    16. The Scottish Enlightenment (II): Thomas Reid
    17. Enlightenment Deism, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, And Mary Wollstonecraft
    18. Immanuel Kant
    19. German Idealism And Hegel
    20. Karl Marx
    21. Sren Kierkegaard
    22. John Stuart Mill And Nineteenth-Century Positivism
    23. Friedrich Nietzsche
    24. Conclusions: Some Lessons From The History Of Western Philosophy

    Author Index
    Subject Index
    Scripture Index

    Additional Info
    Plato. Aristotle. Augustine. Hume. Kant. Hegel.

    These names and the philosophies associated with them ring through the minds of every student and scholar of philosophy. And in their search for knowledge, every student of philosophy needs to know the history of the philosophical discourse such giants have bequeathed us.

    Noted philosopher C. Stephen Evans brings his expertise to this daunting task as he surveys the history of Western philosophy, from the Pre-Socratics to Nietzsche and postmodernism-and every major figure and movement in between.

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  • Lotus And The Rose

    $18.95

    Namchak Publishing Title

    Spirited conversations on spiritual topics between two friends–an American Lama and an Episcopal minister–who celebrate their common ground and delight in their differences.

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  • Aristotelian Tradition Of Natural Kinds And Its Demise

    $75.00

    There are two great traditions of natural-kinds realism: the modern, instituted by Mill and elaborated by Venn, Peirce, Kripke, Putnam, Boyd, and others; and the ancient, instituted by Aristotle, elaborated by the medieval Aristotelians, and eventually overthrown by Galilean and Newtonian physicists, by Locke, Leibniz, and Kant, and by Darwin. Whereas the former tradition has lately received the close attention it deserves, the latter has not. The Aristotelian Tradition of Natural Kinds and its Demise is meant to fill this gap. The volume’s theme is the emergence of Aristotle’s account of species, what Schoolmen such as Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham did with this account, and the tacit if not explicit rejection of all such accounts in modern scientific theory. By tracing this history Stewart Umphrey shows that there have been not one but two relevant scientific revolutions or paradigm shifts in the history of natural philosophy. The first, brought about by Aristotle, may be viewed as a renewal of Presocratic natural philosophy in the light of Socrates’s second sailing and his insistence that we attend to what is first for us. It features an eido-centric conception of living organisms and other enduring things, and strongly resists any reduction of physics to mathematics. The second revolution, brought about by seventeenth-century physics, features a nomo-centric view according to which what is fundamental in nature are not enduring individuals and their kinds, as we commonly suppose, but rather certain mathematizable relations among varying physical quantities. Umphrey examines and compares these two very different ways of understanding the natural order.

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  • Good People Bad Things And Vice Versa

    $12.99

    One of the most difficult questions that has challenged ordinary men and the world’s greatest thinkers and philosophers throughout the ages has been, Why do bad things happen to good people and why do good things happen to bad people? The answer to this conundrum lies in simply reprograming the way we think about inequity and the divine order of things. Join Bible teacher Dr. Delron Shirley as he explores the biblical truths that will help unravel this mystery

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  • Writing And Freedom

    $60.00

    Twelve essays in literary theory, philosophy, and religion–about atheism, freedom, and the Jesus thought experiment–connect, but don’t conclude. A recurring theme is the nothing at the heart of the deep atheism of George Eliot, Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, Rudyard Kipling, and Thomas Hardy, who approach nothing with a directness lacking in their English-speaking philosophical contemporaries. How does being in the world–Thomas Nagel’s what-it’s-likeness–and how do values–Alasdair MacIntyre’s justice and misericordia–fare in the face of the mindless It that Hardy finds at the heart of things? A pivotal essay compares the theism of Paul Ricoeur and the atheism of Daniel Dennett–the subtitle is a response to the latter’s latest book. Writing and Freedom defends (a strong version of) free will as necessarily interpersonal: my freedom is nothing but my acceptance of yours. This is how Milton, Rossetti, and Dickinson treat their readers, and how scientists and philosophers ideally treat each other. The book’s open-ended essays model freedom so understood. Moreover, both nothing and freedom are fundamental to biblical and religious narratives (Mark and Newman). God, being out of all relation with the finite, cannot be known from the text of the world. Yet as nothing, God may be said to grant unconditional autonomy to his creatures, and therefore to be present in his absence. It is round nothing, therefore, that atheists and theists endlessly circulate. But that is what the deep atheism of European thinkers–Nietzsche, Freud, Lacan, and Zizek–say we all do anyway, however excitedly we pretend to ourselves that we don’t

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  • Get Lost : Why We Need To Rediscover The Spiritual Practice Of Wandering

    $26.99

    In this inspiring manifesto, the New York Times bestselling author of Religious Literacy and God Is Not One calls us to embrace an ancient practice at the heart of many religions and cultures-wandering-to help us reconnect with our own souls and find renewed meaning in our lives

    The overwhelming focus on increased efficiency and incessant drive in today’s globalized world may benefit corporate bottom lines, but it is having an adverse impact on everyday lives. Navigating our way in a world defined by constant stimulation and the demand to always be moving forward has left us feeling unmoored, unsettled, and strangely uncomfortable in our own skin.

    Stephen Prothero, too, has felt the anxiety, strain, and alienation caused by modern life. Enduring a divorce and a sudden move, the scholar and writer embarked on an experiment that would prove transformative and deeply satisfying. Instead of adhering to a rigid schedule, he allowed himself to embrace a time-honored spiritual practice that values exploration and intrepidness: wandering. Prothero made time to wander, both physically, through travel, and intellectually, through reading and study.

    Get Lost is an exploration of the social, psychological, and spiritual virtues of this ancient tradition and how it has been exercised and cherished throughout history-yet is devalued by contemporary culture’s obsession with constant productivity and success. By pointing to models and stories of those who wander, from the Buddha to Jack Kerouac to the biblical Hagar to Mary Oliver, Prothero provides an antidote to what ails our purpose-driven society. He calls for the practice of unsettling yourself as a necessary first step in the journey to discover who we are and understand the true meaning of being home.

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  • Love In The Void

    $12.00

    Simone Weil, the great mystic and philosopher for our age, shows where anyone can find God.

    Why is it that Simone Weil, with her short, troubled life and confounding insights into faith and doubt, continues to speak to today’s spiritual seekers? Was it her social radicalism, which led her to renounce privilege? Her ambivalence toward institutional religion? Her combination of philosophical rigor with the ardor of a mystic?

    Albert Camus called Simone Weil the only great spirit of our time. Andre Gide found her the most truly spiritual writer of this century. Her intense life and profound writings have influenced people as diverse as T. S. Eliot, Charles De Gaulle, Pope Paul VI, and Adrienne Rich.

    The body of work she left–most of it published posthumously–is the fruit of an anguished but ultimately luminous spiritual journey.

    After her untimely death at age thirty-four, Simone Weil quickly achieved legendary status among a whole generation of thinkers. Her radical idealism offered a corrective to consumer culture. But more importantly, she pointed the way, especially for those outside institutional religion, to encounter the love of God – in love to neighbor, love of beauty, and even in suffering.

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  • Philosophy Of The Christian Religion

    $40.00

    Each field of study comes with its own set of questions; each period of time refines and redirects those questions. The Christian religion as we find it in the twenty-first century presents a unique set of problems to be solved and questions to be answered. In this introduction to the philosophy of the Christian religion, eminent philosopher and theologian Nancey Murphy applies the tools of philosophical analysis to a set of core yet contemporary religious questions: what does our historical moment mean for the possibility of knowing God? Is faith still possible? Does God intervene in human history? Is there such a thing as universal knowledge of God? Written with the needs of students encountering the philosophy of religion for the first time in mind, this book provides a comprehensive introduction to the fundamental questions inherent in Christian faith. Murphy also provides tools for how to answer those questions.

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  • World Within The Word

    $60.00

    This book, written in 1957, arises from the encounter of two men: the American poet Samuel Hazo and the French philosopher Jacques Maritain. They met on September 12, 1956, at Maritain’s home in Princeton, New Jersey. Hazo sought to engage Maritain’s diffuse writings in aesthetics by bringing them into conversation with the great voices of the English literary tradition, especially Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and John Keats.

    Hazo was also striving to understand and articulate his own experience of the creative process. Then at the beginning of his writing life, he would later emerge as a leading voice in American poetry. He is the author of more than thirty collections, the winner of many awards, the founder of the International Poerty Forum, and a National Book Award finalist.

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  • Studies In Philosophy And The History Of Philosophy Volume 1

    $34.95

    The character of this work is perhaps sufficently indicated by its title. However it must be noted that the term philosophy is not used so strictly as to exclude material from other disciplines connected with philosophy or helpful to it and to an understanding of its history.

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  • Studies In Philosophy And The History Of Philosophy Volume 2

    $34.95

    The character of this work is perhaps sufficently indicated by its title. However it must be noted that the term philosophy is not used so strictly as to exclude material from other disciplines connected with philosophy or helpful to it and to an understanding of its history.

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  • John Duns Scotus 1265-1965

    $34.95

    This volume was a cooperative effort of European, American and Canadian scholars which was published to commemorate the occasion of the seventh centennial of the bith of John Duns Scotus.

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